Photography By Janet Delaney
Oct18

Photography By Janet Delaney

Some sample pictures from some of the projects of California-based photographer Janet Delaney. In the 1980s Janet made a number of trips to New York and wandered the streets with a twin lens Rolleiflex camera capturing some lovely examples of street photography. Another project from decades past is the series of photos South of Market 1978-1986. I’ve got a soft spot for Beijing having been there for my honeymoon so it’s nice to see some photos from that wonderful city too. The last lot of photos I want to share come from Janet’s collections from South of Market (now) – a revisit to the area she photographed in the 1980s to highlight what has changed and what it heralds for the future – and Managua, Nicaragua...

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Things To Do With Babies #1
Oct09

Things To Do With Babies #1

Things To Do With Babies #1 Sniper...

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Birds Of England’s East Coast
Sep13

Birds Of England’s East Coast

Something for ornithologists and amateur bird-watchers alike, a selection of some of the more rare birds you might just spot out and about around the eastern coast of England between late summer and early winter. Factory Swan Named because their black feathers were believed to be the result of soot belching out from late Victorian factories when the birds were first identified living in large groups alongside the Thames estuary these swans are actually 19th century immigrants from Iceland whose colouring made them easy to spot by predators once that country underwent The Coldening during the early 1800s. Their beaks have a very distinctive red flash along the top in adulthood, the result of staining from the swans’ preferred food source of subterranean cherries. Narcissus Tern Visually very similar to other terns along shorelines across northern Europe but distinguishable by silver flecks across the breast and eyes typically 15% larger than other birds of the Sternidae familiy, it is, however, the behaviour of these seabirds that gives them their obvious name; prior to courting – and to a lesser extent immediately before feeding – the Narcissus Tern will often seek out highly reflective surfaces and stare at itself intently, grooming when necessary, but sometimes simply staring at itself at the expense of all other activity. Some bird experts suggest this forms a means of “psyching itself up” although there is no consensus of opinion. Magpie Eagle Not a magpie and not an eagle, but actually a medium-sized hawk typically residing in urban areas in a rough triangle formed of London, Colchester, and Ramsgate during the colder weather, moving to the countryside as the temperatures increase. The bird’s feathers form a black and white fractal pattern that roughly resembles birds in flight but it’s the hawk’s unusual penchant for stealing bright objects with which to decorate its nesting areas – vacant beehives – that gives it part of its name; the remainder being a printing mistake from the definitive 1932 publication of British Hawks & Turtles that’s yet to be rectified. Logan’s Turnstone Like other turnstones the Logan’s Turnstone lives by the coast and feeds on insects, crustaceans, and molluscs, most often in areas with seaweed-covered rocks. Unlike other turnstones the Logan’s Turnstone often throws itself off cliff edges in large numbers once it reaches what is for the bird old age; for reasons not understood it will not use its wings and will either smash itself on the surface below or, if above water, allow itself to drown. The name Logan’s Turnstone was adopted in the 1970s after the movie Logan’s Run, replacing the previous and politically-incorrect name of...

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Photography By David Stewart
Aug25

Photography By David Stewart

There’s a very distinctive style to David Stewart‘s photography – especially the pictures of his that really caught my eye, anyway – and that’s one of very staged, very clean, very coordinated, very well lit, often very static shots, with occasional touches of humour or absurdity. Click on the photos below to view the images in their full glory on David’s site, along with a great many others. Four beautiful books of his photos are also available to...

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Dreamcatcher
Aug19

Dreamcatcher

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Real Photogravure Letter Card Of Gloucester, 1938
Mar22

Real Photogravure Letter Card Of Gloucester, 1938

I’m always on the look out for old things related to photography so it was with extreme joy that I found a miniature treasure trove of items in a number of charity shops yesterday. In addition to some old naval photos and postcards and someone’s photo album featuring pictures from the 1940s in South Africa (I’ll scan and upload those at some point in the future) I also found a photogravure letter card dated September 1938. I’ve taken some photos of the letter card and attempted to transcribe it below, albeit with limited success. Any assistance at working out the words I’ve missed will be gratefully received. The front cover of the photogravure letter card complete with its one and a half pence stamp. “With signature only and flap tucked in – Printed paper rate. If message written, letter postage is chargeable, in which case gum down flap.” The letter card was sent to Mr and Mrs Arthur Wood, Mere View, Walton on the Hill, Tadworth, Surrey. The letter card consists of five images of Gloucester: Gloucester Cathedral from the southeast; the nave, Gloucester Cathedral; the New Inn Hotel; the Cross; Westgate Street. And now to the letter itself: 52 […] Road, Gloucester, 21.9.38 Dear Mr & Mrs Wood, I am wondering how you all are at Tadworth by this time. I trust that you are all well. What very serious and disturbing times we are living in. I hope and pray please God that it will all be settled without war. Without doubt these are the perilous times spoken of in the Bible. I am thinking of you all in the prayer meetings at this busy[?] time 9 o’clock Wednesday evening[?]. I miss […] to chapel very much since I have come to Gloucester but the first fortnight when I was in Newcastle I did well. My friends there took me to chapel each week night & twice on Sundays & then when Muriel and I got home to Wembley her daddy took me to Mr Bartlett’s twice, & the Second Sun he took me to Ponsard Road to Mr […] Chapel. We had him to tea with us at Wembley & we all drove back together to the early[?] service[?]. I like his preaching very much. His wife was away at the Sea & he was going to her on the Monday. Mr Bartlett is expected to preach a […] […] in […] so I am hoping to stay there for the weekend this[?] 2 weeks yesterday. Tuesday I heard Mr Hurst the editor of “Way Marks” at […]; he took The Lords Prayer for his subject....

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