Real Photogravure Letter Card Of Gloucester, 1938
Mar22

Real Photogravure Letter Card Of Gloucester, 1938

I’m always on the look out for old things related to photography so it was with extreme joy that I found a miniature treasure trove of items in a number of charity shops yesterday. In addition to some old naval photos and postcards and someone’s photo album featuring pictures from the 1940s in South Africa (I’ll scan and upload those at some point in the future) I also found a photogravure letter card dated September 1938. I’ve taken some photos of the letter card and attempted to transcribe it below, albeit with limited success. Any assistance at working out the words I’ve missed will be gratefully received. The front cover of the photogravure letter card complete with its one and a half pence stamp. “With signature only and flap tucked in – Printed paper rate. If message written, letter postage is chargeable, in which case gum down flap.” The letter card was sent to Mr and Mrs Arthur Wood, Mere View, Walton on the Hill, Tadworth, Surrey. The letter card consists of five images of Gloucester: Gloucester Cathedral from the southeast; the nave, Gloucester Cathedral; the New Inn Hotel; the Cross; Westgate Street. And now to the letter itself: 52 […] Road, Gloucester, 21.9.38 Dear Mr & Mrs Wood, I am wondering how you all are at Tadworth by this time. I trust that you are all well. What very serious and disturbing times we are living in. I hope and pray please God that it will all be settled without war. Without doubt these are the perilous times spoken of in the Bible. I am thinking of you all in the prayer meetings at this busy[?] time 9 o’clock Wednesday evening[?]. I miss […] to chapel very much since I have come to Gloucester but the first fortnight when I was in Newcastle I did well. My friends there took me to chapel each week night & twice on Sundays & then when Muriel and I got home to Wembley her daddy took me to Mr Bartlett’s twice, & the Second Sun he took me to Ponsard Road to Mr […] Chapel. We had him to tea with us at Wembley & we all drove back together to the early[?] service[?]. I like his preaching very much. His wife was away at the Sea & he was going to her on the Monday. Mr Bartlett is expected to preach a […] […] in […] so I am hoping to stay there for the weekend this[?] 2 weeks yesterday. Tuesday I heard Mr Hurst the editor of “Way Marks” at […]; he took The Lords Prayer for his subject....

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Architectural Photography By Weronika Dudka
Mar15

Architectural Photography By Weronika Dudka

Weronika Dudka is a Leicester-based design student who has discovered a fondness for photographing brutalist and modernist buildings. Understandably so, as I’ve got a similar love for those particular architectural styles which more often than not meets with much shaking of the head when I express it. There’s a beauty in the geometry, symmetry, and repetition that’s hard to get across to people who can’t see past the typical colour scheme of the buildings that features more shades of grey than an E. L. James novel and very little else. There’s also a mystique to brutalism that some people don’t get as the architect’s vision is usually transformed wildly and often darkly by the social structure in which the building is located; far more so in my opinion than any other type of architecture. Enough of my waffling about the glorious gorgeousness that is brutalist architecture and onto the reason for this post, which is to showcase some of Weronika’s photos, all of which were sourced from her Tumblr page: Veronicadelica. Brutalist photography is most often dark, oppressive, and impressive, but here’s a great example of injecting colour into the shot thanks to some great reflections from the Manchester sky. And colour looks good on less brutal, more modernist architecture too as seen in this photo from Birmingham. The more familiar black and white shot now most associated with brutalist architecture photography but you can hopefully see in this photo from Sheffield how the block design resembles a monochromatic Mondrian work of art. A great example of a typical brutalist external staircase, this from a building in Sheffield. You often see these simple rectangular blocks and parallelograms forming stairwells but the curved backside is great to spot too. What’s also really nice here is the paint job which shows off the potential for just how attractive this type of architecture can look in the right setting and with the right light. A nicely-framed photo from Manchester showcasing the geometry and the contrast of angles prevalent in brutalism. Spirals, zig-zags, and long, vertical lines come together in this photo from Birmingham. A colour version of the same shot can be seen here. To finish with, Carradale House in London shot by Weronika. The building is one of Goldfinger‘s listed modernist designs. Sky bridges and narrow windows reminiscent of medieval arrowslits merge to form another wonderful piece of architecture. Check out all of Weronika’s photos as well as the things she finds inspiring here. Iain Baker liked this...

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Portsmouth, Alien Invasion – Air Corps
Mar14

Portsmouth, Alien Invasion – Air Corps

The defence of Portsmouth during the alien invasion by the Squirmy Munge wasn’t simply limited to the home or street patrols; the island city had itself a small but well-prepared, well-cared-for, and very effective air force operating out of the area that would naturally become Portsmouth Airport after the war. Linda Matheson was probably the most well-known of the Portsmouth Air Corps pilots. Her tenacity and bravery in air combat led to rapid promotion and she was often mobbed for autographs when spotted out and about in the city. In the air she flew over one hundred and thirty sorties. Actual enemy kills were difficult to confirm as the Munge attack craft were incredibly robust and fitted out with advanced shielding; the aliens would most often retreat before receiving significant damage and on the rare occasions when the air corps inflicted enough hits the Munge machines would explode forcefully enough to not leave any remains at...

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FriendFeed Is Dead
Mar09

FriendFeed Is Dead

Nothing lasts forever, and so it is with FriendFeed which has been the place I’ve visited most and liked the most on the internet for a great many years now. It was the best social network with the best social networking tools and there’s been nothing even remotely close to it in terms of friendliness or usability since its arrival. And that’s the worst part of it; nothing else has come close at all. I saw relationships form and marriages follow; I had some great arguments with people who I then came to consider friends; I met people from the internet in real life; I enjoyed seeing posts roll up my home stream in real time in English, Italian, German, Turkish, and Farsi. It’s all come to an end rather abruptly, rather sadly. It could have been handled better but faceless corporations aren’t known for their humanity. There’s no room for emotion in business, even if your business is built on people. In the admittedly small hope that something will one day plug the gap that FriendFeed filled, my connection details for any other current or former FriendFeeders are: Twitter: https://twitter.com/neonbubble Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neonbubble Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/neonbubble Instagram: https://instagram.com/mrneonbubble/ I’d link to G+ but by the time I’ve added the tag Google will have closed that down. Helen Marina Sventitsky-Rother, Matthew Charlton, Jenny Hansen, Todd Brent Schaus, Josh Haley, Iain Baker, Kristin Royal, Anne Bouey, Patricia Elizabeth liked this...

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The Crackerjack Book Of Games
Mar03

The Crackerjack Book Of Games

Found, appropriately enough, on the always excellent Found Objects are these pictures from the 1965 Crackerjack Book of Games. Pictures on that site, yes, but no text to go with them. Fortunately, though, I’ve been able to dig out some of the game instructions. 1965 was a very different time. The Microwave Game Here’s a fun activity for all you kids whose fathers are working with one of those new-fangled industrial microwave ovens in use at all the civic cremation zones. With a friend, or if/when you don’t have a friend any longer then against the clock, see how long you can withstand the intense heat inside these miracles of modern technology. Once you’re good enough why not see whose skin can form the largest blister before it explodes and the agony of tearing skin and exposed flesh to the electromagnetic radiation becomes too much for any juvenile human to bear? The Tower Of Power You’ll need building blocks to construct towers for this game so why not pop down to Woolworths and pick up a bargain bag of Woolworths Own Brand Cups ‘N’ Discs with your earnings from scarecrowing? Gather around a table with your best friends and race against one another to build a monument that stretches towards Heaven. The winner is the first person to become filled with the Power of God and finds him or herself compelled to yell Halleluia!. Extra points if the power causes your opponents’ towers to collapse. Mind Control Here’s a game that’s both relaxing and rewarding! Can you use your telekinetic powers to get a marble to roll out of a cup and up a piece of wood? You’ll need all your powers of concentration for this but if you succeed then get your mother or father to give the local government psychic warfare recruiting offices a call and get ready for a life of intrigue and riches beyond your wildest dreams! Old Billy Old Billy is the classic family game of make-believe and dress-up brought into the sixties with a way to win! Ask your parents for permission to use their copies of The National White Person when they’ve finished memorising it for the day and dress yourself up as that boozy rascal of a tramp, Old Billy. You’ll need to stay out overnight, probably down by the canal, but if you can return home without being set alight then you win a point and it’s time for your brother or sister to see if they can do the same. Who will get the highest score? Super Sense When Britain begins its conquest of Asia in the next decade...

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Afghanistan Honour Killings
Mar03

Afghanistan Honour Killings

From the New York Times a quite disturbing read on how women in Afghanistan suffer in a culture so horribly twisted by tradition, social indoctrination, and religious interpretation that it sees the murder of a family member preferable to allowing people – daughters, nieces, or cousins – to simply live their lives the way they want. A Thin Line of Defense Against ‘Honor Killings’: Gul Meena, 16, survived a brutal attack by her brother after she fled an older husband, who had beaten her, and ran away with another man. She had been just 8 or 9 in her home in Kunar Province on the Pakistan border when a man in the next village offered money to her unemployed father for her. […] From the moment she arrived in his house, she was a servant. The only grace was that he was not allowed to have sex with her before she had her first period. Two years after they wed, the moment came and he forced himself on her. “I was like a thing and they sold me,” she said. “He was beating me with everything near to him. With his glasses, with his mobile phone, with wood, with stones, and with his hands.” Lonely and bewildered, she tried at least twice to return to her father’s house, but the family sent her back to her husband and finally she went to a neighbor’s home. The husband of the family ran away with her to Nangarhar Province in eastern Afghanistan. When her brother caught up with them, he slit the man’s throat and slashed Gul Meena 15 times with an ax, nearly blinding her and leaving her for dead. When she woke up in the hospital, she looked in the mirror. “I was very damaged,” she said. “Before, I was beautiful and young.” Although she does not see herself that way, she is still a stunning young woman. She has never gone to school but speaks with a simple eloquence. Now she fears that she is ugly and no one will marry her. “Men are always interested in the beauty of a woman,” she said. “They are never interested in the heart.” It’s a dreadfully sad outlook, though obviously understandable, and it’s one of only a few stories. Well worth a good...

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