Photography By David Stewart
Aug25

Photography By David Stewart

There’s a very distinctive style to David Stewart‘s photography – especially the pictures of his that really caught my eye, anyway – and that’s one of very staged, very clean, very coordinated, very well lit, often very static shots, with occasional touches of humour or absurdity. Click on the photos below to view the images in their full glory on David’s site, along with a great many others. Four beautiful books of his photos are also available to...

Read More
Vintage Japanese Travel Posters
Aug22

Vintage Japanese Travel Posters

Is there anything the Japanese can’t do and somehow make a little bit weird? That’s a rhetorical question, of course. Boosting travel to a country whilst standing out from the crowd of other countries also trying to boost travel is a tricky business but Japan certainly seemed to have a flair for it with this series of posters from the early-to-mid twentieth century promoting their nation as the destination of choice for travellers looking for something a little bit different. There’s a wonderful stylishness in the artwork and they’re certain to have stopped would-be vacationers in their tracks whilst perusing the local travel agent...

Read More
Dreamcatcher
Aug19

Dreamcatcher

...

Read More
Computer Dreams
Aug18

Computer Dreams

A VHS recording transferred to digital (as they all should be) highlighting the state of the art in computer graphics from the dim and distant past of 1988. Hosted by Amanda Pays this hour-long showcase is a visual treat and a great trip down memory lane for those of us who lived through this exciting period of shiny surfaces rendered over the course of days in ray tracing...

Read More
Orbital Snooker 2000
Aug18

Orbital Snooker 2000

The late 1970s saw a flood of speculative sporting instruction manuals hit book shelves including some of the more well-known such as Mixed Tug O’ War (Punk Edition), Rally Car Jousting, and Table Polo. Those books, at least, had some chance of actually being played but the same couldn’t be said for the end of the decade’s Orbital Snooker 2000 by Irish author Lee Ayres. Ayres was a reasonably well-respected futurist and extrapolated then present day materials and technologies into the heady days of the twenty first century to come up with the rules of the game he considered would become the opium of the world’s populations. It was his intention to become the father of the sport and cash in on global licencing rights but his vision of coloured mile-wide spheres of graphene piloted by the criminal masses of competing nations attempting to knock their opponents into the sun and gain their freedom was just a little too expensive to...

Read More